Small Fraction of Internet Has Adopted IPv6

IPv4 is down to the last crumbs.

By Enterprise Networking Planet Staff | Posted Apr 22, 2011
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Arbor Networks has published a study of "native IPv6 traffic volumes across multiple large carriers" and found that "only a small fraction of the Internet has adopted IPv6." According to this ZDNET Blog report by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, if you’re in charge of a business, you’re eventually going to need more Internet addresses and the IPv4 address cupboard is bare.


"Oh, no one’s going to try to Google “Lady Gaga” tomorrow and find that her YouTube videos are gone. But, if you’re in charge of a business, you’re eventually going to need more Internet addresses and the IPv4 address cupboard is bare. Indeed, the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC), which is in charge of all Asian Internet addresses, is now down to its last IPv4 crumbs.

"The situation isn’t a lot better in North America. The American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) tells me that, 'ARIN has seen a steady, if not, slight decline in the number of IPv4 request since IANA reached depletion of their IPv4 pool in early February 2011. However, ARIN has seen a substantial increase in the number of IPv6 requests since that same time. Currently, ARIN has over 5 /8s of IPv4 address and expects this will last through most of this year and possibly into next year.'"

Read the Full Story at ZDNET Blog

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