New Mule Release Helps Enterprises Prep for Cloud

Ross Mason, founder and CTO, spoke to IT Business Edge's Loraine Lawson about what enterprise customers want in terms of cloud integration and how the open source ESB company addressed these issues in its new edition for enterprises, Mule 3.1, which was released on Jan. 11.

By Loraine Lawson | Posted Jan 18, 2011
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Ross Mason, MuleSoft founder and CTO, spoke to IT Business Edge's Loraine Lawson about what enterprise customers want in terms of cloud integration and how the open source ESB company addressed these issues in its new edition for enterprises, Mule 3.1, which was released on Jan. 11. Lawson and Mason also discussed whether Java's uncertain future has impacted Mule's development plans going forward.

 

“... we're seeing a lot more of these types of smaller workflow scenarios, where you want two or three applications all sharing information between them based on events triggered inside those applications.”


Ross Mason
Founder and CTO
MuleSoft

Lawson: This month you released Mule 3.1 for enterprises. What's changed since 3.0?

Mason: The whole point of Mule 3 was really to simplify what the ESB is to a broader audience, and what we've been finding with Mule is that we're getting a lot more adoption outside of your typical SOA, infrastructure applications and people doing a lot more sort of point-to-point and tactical integration and departmental apps with it. So Mule 3 really gets focused on simplicity and being able to lower the bar for entry for new users.

... Cloud Connect was an absolute massive hit for us. It really sort of resonated well with users and customers and we actually spent a lot of 3.1 really doing it a [revision] on Mule Cloud Connect. So there's a lot of new features in there for working with connectors in an even easier way.

That way you can now consume these connectors in Mule 3, they're much easier to sort of wire into like a process orchestration, if you like, and we've lowered the bar for both people using them, but also we're seeing a steady interest from partners wanting to build their own for their own platform for things like Intuit.

So Cloud Connect in 3.1 has become a real powerhouse in my mind, both in terms of the connectors supported. We've had Salesforce in there, we've completely rounded that out now. We have support for all the Amazon APIs and Web services, and we've rounded out Facebook and Twitter support – which, surprising actually, are very popular. I mean, I know they're popular [on the] consumer side, but we're seeing more people wanting to integrate with those platforms in other ways, which is pretty interesting.

Lawson: When you say that customers are using it to connect to Intuit and build their own platforms, what do you mean?

Mason: Building their own connectors. They obviously have a whole set of services on their platform and we're working with them to build out cloud connectors for everything they do, actually. So that's pretty interesting.

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