CentOS 5: Linux for Grownups - Page 2

By Carla Schroder | Posted Apr 24, 2007
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Not-Ready-For-Prime-Time Extras

CentOS includes a number of applications that Red Hat calls "Technology Previews." These are new applications that are not supported by Red Hat, but since you're using CentOS you don't care anyway. You'll find a list in the release notes for RHEL 5. Two that I found especially interesting are Stateless Linux and Frysk.

Stateless Linux apparently wants to divorce software from hardware, and allow you to magically have your complete filesystem at any random physical location. OK, so it's not quite like that. But the goals are many- central storage and operations while also using local hardware resources intelligently, mixing-and-matching local and remote filesystems without hassles, automatic hardware configuration, automatic X Windows configuration, and quick painless migration to a new device. Hey, why not ask for the moon!

The Frysk real-time monitoring and debugging tool seems similar to the powerful and all-knowing DTrace in Solaris, only easier to use. Check out this Red Hat magazine article, Frysk: Debugging in real time.

Running CentOS

After installation there is a refreshing lack of drama. It just works. I have a couple of CentOS 4 servers that have not been restarted in over a year; they just keep trundling along. You might want to tweak your Yum repositories to select geographically close ones, and perform your usual personal customizations. I like it as a server operating system; it's rock-solid. It's also good as an enterprise desktop for these reasons: mass customized rollouts are dead easy thanks to Kickstart, and because of RHEL's conservative approach to software management you're not likely to be bitten by half-baked updates.

The CentOS team promise a long support cycle for every release. CentOS 3 will receive maintenance updates until 2010, CentOS 4 until 2012, and probably 2014 for CentOS 5.

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