Securing a Windows Server? Time to Talk SCAT. - Page 2

By Drew Bird | Posted Sep 13, 2004
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Continued From Page 1

Running the SCA Tool

Back to the SCA tool, and before we conclude Part One of this article, we’ll look at the most basic function of the utility – running a security analysis on the system.

When you start the SCA tool for the first time, you are presented with two options - open an existing database, or create a new one. Working on the assumption that a database is not yet in place, creating a new database is the first step. The instructions for creating a new database are provided on the screen, so we won’t cover them here. During the creation process, you are prompted for the security template you would like to import as part of the database. The template you choose will be the one used for comparison to your system settings. For this initial analysis, choose a template such as SecureDC, as it will provide a larger number of configuration settings and subsequent comparisons.

Figure 3. A security analysis in progress.
(Click for a larger image)
After creating the database, start the analysis by clicking the Action menu and choosing Analyze Computer Now. You will be prompted for log file path, and then the analysis will start. The seven areas of configuration discussed earlier are scanned, as shown in Figure 3.

Once the scan is complete, you can view the results of the scan by clicking through the various elements of the policy and viewing the settings. As you can see from Figure 4, which shows the results of an analysis, the settings have icons attached to them such as a red circle with a cross, or a white circle with a question mark. These icons indicate what state that setting is, compared to the security template used for the analysis.

Figure 4. Results from a security analysis.
(Click for a larger image)

We’ll talk more about the icons and what they mean in Part Two of this article. We’ll also go through the process of verifying and configuring your security configuration from a template. Finally, we’ll look at how to use templates to reestablish baseline security settings on your server. Until next time!

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