Before Trouble Strikes: The Sequel - Page 2

By Elizabeth Ferrarini | Posted Jul 13, 2001
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Test the Plan
Testing the plan enables the disaster recovery planning team to see how their recovery plan and procedures work in practice. It enables everyone to get a reasonable assurance that a plan will make the grade when it really counts -- in an actual disaster.

  1. Develop test strategy.
  2. Develop test plans.
  3. Conduct tests.
  4. Modify the plan as necessary.

On-going Maintenance

Maintain the Plan

Disaster recovery plans can have a shelf life between six to 12 months depending on the changes in the organization's procedures, systems, and personnel. Having a program in place to maintain the plan will ensure that everyone, especially the disaster recovery planning team, will be ready if a real emergency occurs.

The senior management executive responsible for disaster recovery assisted by the disaster recovery coordinator should oversee this step:

  1. Review changes in the environment, technology, and procedures.
  2. Develop maintenance triggers and procedures.
  3. Submit changes for systems development procedures.
  4. Modify unit change management procedures.
  5. Produce plan updates and distribute.
  6. Establish period review and update procedures.

Test the Plan
Testing the plan enables the disaster recovery planning team to see how their recovery plan and procedures work in practice. It enables everyone to get a reasonable assurance that a plan will make the grade when it really counts -- in an actual disaster.

  1. Develop test strategy.
  2. Develop test plans.
  3. Conduct tests.
  4. Modify the plan as necessary.

On-going Maintenance

Maintain the Plan

Disaster recovery plans can have a shelf life between six to 12 months depending on the changes in the organization's procedures, systems, and personnel. Having a program in place to maintain the plan will ensure that everyone, especially the disaster recovery planning team, will be ready if a real emergency occurs.

The senior management executive responsible for disaster recovery assisted by the disaster recovery coordinator should oversee this step:

  1. Review changes in the environment, technology, and procedures.
  2. Develop maintenance triggers and procedures.
  3. Submit changes for systems development procedures.
  4. Modify unit change management procedures.
  5. Produce plan updates and distribute.
  6. Establish period review and update procedures.

Elizabeth M. Ferrarini is a free-lance writer based in Arlington, Massachusetts.

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