Global Average Internet Connection Speeds Reaches 6.3 Mbps in 3Q16

Akamai's Third Quarter 2016 State of the Internet Report shows a 21 percent year-over-year increase in the global average internet connection speed.

By Sean Michael Kerner | Posted Dec 21, 2016
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The internet keeps on getting faster, quarter after quarter, as the latest Akamai State of the Internet report shows once again. For the third quarter of 2016, Akamai reported that the global average connection speed to the internet was 6.3 Mbps, which is a 21 percent year-over-year gain.

The average connection speed is just that, the average of the all the connections that are made to Akamai's global content delivery network platform. In contrast, the global average peak connection speed, which measures the highest speeds, was reported at 37.2 Mbps, for a 16 percent gain over the third quarter of 2015.

Once again, South Korea was reported to be the top nation on the planet for average connection speed, with 26.3 Mbps. In contrast, the average connection speed for the U.S was reported at 16.3 Mbps. Singapore had the top peak speed at 162 Mbps, while the average peak connection in the U.S was 70.8 Mbps.

Akamai also details average and peak connection speed by state. The District of Columbia had the fastest average connection speed at 24.8 Mbps, while Maryland had the highest average peak connection in the nation at 90.6 Mbps.

IPv6 adoption is also growing as users and service providers around the world need new address space. According to Akamai, Belgium has the highest IPv6 adoption rate currently, with 39 percent of connections coming in over IPv6. The U.S is not far behind at number four, with 21 percent of connections.

"The holiday season serves as one of the true tests of Internet connectivity as consumers activate slews of connected devices at the same time and more families are at home collectively pushing their broadband capabilities to the limit," David Belson, editor of the State of the Internet Report, said in a statement. "The good news is those limits are getting higher as we have continued to observe positive long-term trends in both average and average peak connection speeds around the world. While 'batteries not included' may still cause unwelcome surprises, we’re optimistic that connection speeds won’t spoil the holidays this year."

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at EnterpriseNetworkingPlanet and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist

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