Linux in a Wireless World - Page 3

By Stew Benedict | Posted Nov 15, 2000
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All the client machines should have the server's IP for the appropriate subnet setup as a gateway for TCP/IP. This is the normal setup I use for IP masquerading and sharing an Internet connection. The server should have IP forwarding enabled. On a Red Hat style system, it will be enabled by the following line in /etc/sysconfig/network:

FORWARD_IPV4=true

Running /etc/rc.d/init.d/pcmcia on the server should generate the two high beeps and display the following on the console:

am930: Io=0x100 irq=3
am930: Firmware Banner: PCnetMobile:v2.01 101498 PI005
f/w version:2.01  date:101498 pi:5
ethconv=rfc1042
AdHoc BSS created, channel=1, rate=20 SSID=AYS_NET

When you run the command ifconfig command, you should now have two Ethernet entries: eth0 and eth1. Now, removing and reinstalling the card generates the two high beeps, and a line like this appears at the end of /VAR/log/messages:
Nov  5 19:34:33 omnibook cardmgr[8131]: + wlan joined BSS, channel=01
bssid=3e:fd:16:00:00:00 ssid="AYS_NET"

You should now be able to access the rest of your network. In my casual testing, I found little difference in performance from the 10Mbs PCMCIA wired Ethernet card.

CrossLinks

Conclusion

I hope you've found this guide useful in setting up a wirelesss network in Linux. For other cards, the driver may be a little different, but the basic concepts are the same. A number of vendors make cards using the Prism and PrismII chipset, and the procedure should be about the same for those cards. //

Stew Benedict is a Systems Administrator for an automotive manufacturer in Cleveland, OH. He also is a freelance consultant, running AYS Enterprises, specializing in printed circuit design, MSAccess solutions for the Windows platforms, and utilizing Linux as a low cost alternative to commercial operating systems and software. He has been using and promoting Linux since about 1994. When not basking in the glow of a CRT, Stew enjoys time with his wife, daughter, and 2 dogs at his future (not too much longer!) retirement home overlooking Norris Lake in the foothills of the Smokies in Tennessee.

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