Ixia Vision One Consolidates Acquired Tech

Ixia leverages technologies gained through multiple acquisitions to power new network visibility appliance.

By Sean Michael Kerner | Posted Mar 14, 2016
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In the modern networking environment, traffic can come from many different locations, including virtual machines, other servers in a data center, and endpoints. In a bid to help enterprises get visibility into what's running on their network, Ixia has released its Vision One technology, which offers the promise of end-to-end network visibility.

"We've built Vision One as an integration of all the different technologies that Ixia has," Glenn Chagnot, Senior Director of Product Management at Ixia, told Enterprise Networking Planet.

Chagnot explained that Vision One is an intelligent network packet processor, meaning the device has an FPGA and a network processor on the appliance to forward and process data packets.

Ixia's patented filter compiler technology accelerates the configuration of rules to help see and understand all traffic. Going a step further, the Vision One is also able to decrypt HTTPS-encrypted web traffic, which is then run through a deep packet inspection engine. The Deep Packet Inspection capability comes to Ixia by way of its 2012 acquisition of BreakingPoint for $160 million.

Vision One also leverage technologies that Ixia gained through its 2013 acquisition of Net Optics. From the Net Optics Xstream product family, the Vision One integrates inline functionality that enables organizations to insert firewall or IPS devices into the visibility patch and be able to scale.

Ixia also acquired networking visibility vendor Anue in 2012, in a deal valued at $145 million. Vision One integrates Anue's Net Tool Optimizer technology, which provides what Chagnot referred to as zero-loss packet processing, which can be helpful for operations like deduplication.

"So if I have multiple network taps into a network and I'm feeding data to my network analysis tools, I don't need multiple copies of the same data packet," Chagnot said. "We're able to strip out the redundant data and then do thinks like insert time stamps to provide precision on when data is received."

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at Enterprise Networking Planet and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

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