Blue Coat Expands Network Security Footprint with Crossbeam Acquisition

Crossbeam's network security products set to be integrated into Blue Coat portfolio

By Sean Michael Kerner | Posted Dec 18, 2012
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Network security vendor Crossbeam is being acquired by Blue Coat Systems. The deal will bring new network security capabilities and products to Blue Coat's portfolio.

David Murphy, chief operating officer and president at Blue Coat, told Enterprise Networking Planet that financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed. Both Blue Coat and Crossbeam are owned by the private equity firm Thoma Bravo. Crossbeam was only acquired by Bravo just over a month ago. Blue Coat itself was acquired by Bravo in December of 2011 for $1.3 billion.

Under Blue Coat ownership, Murphy noted that the Crossbeam brand will be fully integrated into Blue Coat.

The reason why Blue Coat acquired Crossbeam is all about meeting Crossbeamcustomer needs to scale security in the cloud. Murphy explained that his customers have reported that their capacity requirements are growing as mobile and cloud-based solutions are being adopted.

"Being able to scale performance and security in this environment has become a critical requirement for them," Murphy said. "With Crossbeam, we get a highly scalable, fault-tolerant platform that allows enterprises and service providers to consolidate and manage the many different applications used to secure the network."

Blue Coat already has its own set of security technologies. Among them are the ProxySG and the secure web gateway virtual appliance. Blue Coat also has a cloud based threat intelligence service call WebPulse.

Crossbeam's core technology is the company's X-series network security appliances. The promise of the X-series is high speed security services that can run at up to 140 Gbps of throughput.

"Together, the combination of the Crossbeam X-Series platform and our web security solution provides an ideal control point in the network for managing applications that secure both inbound and outbound traffic from all users in any location," Murphy said.

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

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